Nonlinear Dynamics and Control Lab

NDCL in the media

March 11, 2009

5 Robots that Look, Act and Are Designed Like Animals
Humans can engineer machines to mimic animal biology with startling accuracy. But these robots have one important trait not found in nature: They work for us. Scientists studying animal behavior and movement have developed robotic birds and bugs capable of anything from surveillance to space exploration. Here are five of our favorite biologically inspired machines. Read more»

October 29, 2008

ScienCentral news
Underwater robots that swim like fish and work together without someone remotely controlling them? While it seems like the premise for a movie, it's actually a project underway right now.

July 3, 2008

Fun with Robots!
Is that a shark in the water? No, it's a robot! The University of Washington unveils its latest underwater inventions, RoboFish and Seagliders, and makes strides in robotic technology. Find out the latest in robotics — both on land and under the sea — from the inventors themselves. Read more and listen to the show»

June 18, 2008

Schools of Robot Fish Will Soon Infest the Seas
Robots can already mimic people, dogs, cats and insects. They can even walk on water. Now roboticists at the University of Washington have built a school of three robotic fish that swim and communicate wirelessly with one another using sonar signals. (io9) Read more»

June 11, 2008

Amazing robo-fish work together
A trio of robotic fish sporting tails and fins recently aced their first swim team test. (MSNBC) Read more»

Robo-fish may monitor future oil spills
Propelled by a servo-actuated two-link tails and flapping pectoral fins, a new breed of robofish programmed to swim in schools may soon be used to track oil spills or wildlife such as whales. (CNET News) Read more»

June 10, 2008

Robot fish could one day conquer seas
If it swims like a fish and acts like a fish, then it must be a fish, right? Nope, it's robofish, the newest contraption in a lengthening list of electro-mechanical devices based on the secrets of the best designer of all: nature. (ABC News) Read more»

Shoal of robot fish casts a wider net
Robotic fish with flapping fins and tails have been programmed to swim in a school. Aeronautical engineer Kristi Morgansen says artificial fish with group behavior could track marine pollutants or wildlife such as whales. (New Scientist Tech) Read more»

Underwater communication
A University of Washington assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics has built three robot fish that can communicate with one another underwater. (The Engineer Online) Read more»

June 9, 2008

Robofish communicate with each other, engage in synchronized swimming
Traditional fish should definitely start keeping their guard up, as we've seen a noticeable influx of robotic alternatives flapping around here recently. (engadget) Read more»

Robofish to explore the seas of the world
Apparently, one of the biggest pains when it comes to doing research with underwater robots is that, like people, they need to come to the surface pretty frequently. Not to breathe, of course, but to communicate with human wranglers. Not the Robofish. (dvice.com) Read more»

Ocean going Robots
Deep-sea swimming robots are nothing new, yet suffer a significant drawback in that they have to re-surface to communicate and share information. This problem kick-started the development of Robofish at the University of Washington over five years ago and progress, we hear, is going swimmingly. (Electricpig) Read more»

School of Robofish Provides Basis for Teams of Underwater Robots
Most ocean robots have to talk to scientists or satellites to share information. A school of robotic fish developed at the University of Washington communicate directly, allowing them to work cooperatively without ever coming to the surface. (Innovations Report) Read more»

School Of Robofish Communicate With Each Other In Underwater Robot Teams
In the world of underwater robots, this is a team of pioneers. While most ocean robots require periodic communication with scientist or satellite intermediaries to share information, these can work cooperatively communicating only with each other. (ScienceDaily) Read more»

June 8, 2008

Robotic Fish Track Targets, Communicate With One Another
Many of today's underwater robots need to periodically come up to the surface to communicate with their human supervisors. But researchers at the University of Washington (UW) have developed a new kind of underwater vehicle. (slashdot) Read more»

June 7, 2008

Robofish teams of underwater robots
Many of today’s underwater robots need to periodically come up to the surface to communicate with their human supervisors. But researchers at the University of Washington (UW) have developed a new kind of underwater vehicle. (ZDNet) Read more»

New fish-like robots communicate wirelessly with one another underwater
Researchers at the University of Washington have created three fish-like robots that use their fins for propulsion, and communicate wirelessly with one another underwater. (theCheers.org) Read more»

New fish-like robots communicate wirelessly with one another underwater
Researchers at the University of Washington have created three fish-like robots that use their fins for propulsion, and communicate wirelessly with one another underwater.  (newslocale.org)

New fish-like robots communicate wirelessly with one another underwater
Researchers at the University of Washington have created three fish-like robots that use their fins for propulsion, and communicate wirelessly with one another underwater. (DailyIndia.com)

New fish-like robots communicate wirelessly with one another underwater
Researchers at the University of Washington have created three fish-like robots that use their fins for propulsion, and communicate wirelessly with one another underwater. (Thaindian News) Read more»

June 6, 2008

Robofish goes to work underwater
A robotics team at the University of Washington has developed an underwater breakthrough. They wanted to create the most maneuverable, least disruptive robot that can work beneath the surface. KING 5's Gary Chittim shows us, they decided the best plan was to go fish. (KING 5 News

Robofish Work As A Team
In the world of underwater robots, this is a team of pioneers. While most ocean robots require periodic communication with scientist or satellite intermediaries to share information, these can work cooperatively communicating only with each other. (redOrbit) Read more»

School of Robofish provides basis for teams of underwater robots
In the world of underwater robots, this is a team of pioneers. While most ocean robots require periodic communication with scientist or satellite intermediaries to share information, these can work cooperatively communicating only with each other. (7th Space Interactive) Read more»

School of Robofish Provides Basis for Teams of Underwater Robots
In the world of underwater robots, this is a team of pioneers. While most ocean robots require periodic communication with scientist or satellite intermediaries to share information, these can work cooperatively communicating only with each other. (newswise) Read more»

School of Robofish provides basis for underwater robot teams
In the world of underwater robots, this is a team of pioneers. While most ocean robots require periodic communication with scientist or satellite intermediaries to share information, these can work cooperatively communicating only with each other. (physorg.com) Read more»

June 5, 2008

Underwater communication: Robofish are the ultimate in ocean robots, keeping in touch without scientists' help
In the world of underwater robots, this is a team of pioneers. While most ocean robots require periodic communication with scientist or satellite intermediaries to share information, these can work cooperatively communicating only with each other. (University of Washington UWeek) Read more»